Sunday, August 31, 2014

2014 Harley-Davidson Street 500 and 750 Revolution X design story



Video courtesy Youtube.com and raptorama

Green World

Are We On The Verge Of An Electric Car Battery Breakthrough?


An electric plug decal is seen on the back of a Tesla electric car.
An electric plug decal is seen on the back of a Tesla electric car.
CREDIT: AP Photo/Mel Evans
Electric vehicles are cool. They’re inexpensive to operate, can make our air cleaner, and help reduce the amount of climate change-causing gases released into the atmosphere. But right now, they’re also mostly just for rich people. The initial cost of buying the car, combined with their limited availability, is just too much for most people to justify making the switch.
That could soon change, though, because investment pundits think that Tesla Motors is on the verge of achieving something big: A battery cheap enough to make electric vehicles cost-competitive with conventional cars. Daniel Sparks at Motley Fool is reporting that the company is on the right track towards developing a battery that costs only $100 per kilowatt-hour — a cost widely believed to be the threshold where electric vehicles can finally be cost-competitive.
There are a few reasons for this, Sparks writes. The central one is that the company plans to build something called the “Gigafactory,”a giant $5 billion battery manufacturing plant with 6,500 workers. The second is CEO Elon Musk’s own admission that he would be “disappointed” if it took his company 10 years to make a $100 per kilowatt battery pack, and suggested it might happen before 2020.
Sparks acknowledges that CEOs make overzealous predictions all the time. But what makes him more confident that Tesla will be able to achieve the cost reductions necessary to make the battery pack is that Panasonic — a company “arguably more knowledgeable and experienced regarding lithium-ion production than any company in the world” — apparently admitted that Tesla has been making “conservative predictions” about how quickly it will be able to reduce costs. (Panasonic isn’t a disinterested party, though; it’s helping Tesla build the Gigafactory.)
“There is still room for doubting,” Sparks wrote. “But Tesla and Panasonic’s growing confidence certainly makes a good case for the enormous potential of the Gigafactory.”
If the planned Gigafactory is going to be key to Tesla’s success with a cheap electric car battery, it’s still going to take a couple years. That’s because the Gigafactory isn’t even built yet. In fact, Tesla’s not even sure where it’s going to put it, and there’s a fierce competition between at least five states over which one is going to house it.
Musk did recently announce that the company had placed a construction pad in Nevada, but he also said the company may “do something similar in one or two other states” so that the early stages of construction are complete when the decision is finally made. Which state Tesla decides to put the factory in depends on the incentive packages state governments are willing to give Tesla in exchange for heightened economic activity.
The main reason for having a huge factory dedicated to building these batteries is the simple fact that a lot of people want electric cars, but automakers don’t have enough batteries to make them. Musk said the Gigafactory would be able to produce 500,000 vehicles every year. That’s a huge increase from current production rates — as Forbes notes, the batteries produced at the gigafactory in one year would be “more than the entire worldwide production of lithium-ion cells in 2013.”
With the heightened production, Musk says battery costs will eventually be able to be cut by about 30 percent. Tesla doesn’t disclose how much batteries cost it now, but Anthony Ingram at Green Car Reports notes that general predictions are that the company pays $200 to $250 per kilowatt hour, the lowest of any electric automaker.
As of now, transportation — the whole gambit of cars, trucks, trains, and planes — is the largest single source of air pollution in the country. Needless to say, air pollution causes respiratory conditions like asthma and bronchitis, and increasing the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.
There has been growing debate over whether the proliferation of electric cars will actually put a substantial dent in air pollution or greenhouse gas emissions, mainly focused on the power source of the electric car battery. If the power charging the battery comes from a fossil fuel plant, some say that the lifecycle environmental and health damages of an electric vehicle can actually be greater than gasoline-powered cars.
However, as Sierra Club points out, electric vehicles do emit significantly less air pollution when they are operated in places like California, which relies more heavily on renewables like hydropower to generate electricity. Lifecycle emissions from electric cars drop even further as we retire more coal plants and switch to cleaner sources of power. To find out how clean your electric car would be today in the state you’d charge it in, you can plug your zip code into the EPA’s “Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Calculator.”


Information courtesy::- http://thinkprogress.org

2014 Star Bolt vs. 2013 Harley-Davidson 883 Iron





Video courtesy
youtube.com
motorcycle.com

YAMAHA BOLT

2015 Bolt R-Spec



 

Top Features:
  • The Bolt R-Spec is stripped down and devoid of chrome parts and epitomizes the “Urban Performance Bobber” look. The compact chassis proudly showcases the 58 cubic inch (942cc), air-cooled, 60° V-twin sitting at the heart of the bike.
  • The Bolt R-Spec uses modern technology to create a riding experience superior to other similarly sized machines. Even fuel injection and ignition timing maps have been carefully chosen specifically for this bike to deliver class-leading performance with strong low- and mid-range torque sure to bring a smile to every rider’s face.
  • Components such as the 3.2 gallon fuel tank, belt drive, front and rear wheels, digital meter and steel fender
  • The slim body and low seat design combine to give the motorcycle light maneuverability and a stable handling feeling. The upright riding posture helps the rider feel the wind, hear the sounds, and experience the pulse of the machine.
  • For riders who value personalization, the options for the Bolt R-Spec are limited only by the owner’s imagination. As we say at Star motorcycles, “we build it, you make it your own.” And as the perfect canvas for customization, Bolt R-Spec is the ultimate example of that philosophy.
New for 2015:
  • Revised meter assembly.
Engine:
  • The 58 cubic inch (942cc) engine is an air-cooled SOHC 60ยบ V-twin with four valves per cylinder, a pent-roof-shaped combustion chamber, and 9.0:1 compression ratio. The engine is designed to provide excellent power and superior low-end torque.
  • To keep friction loss to a minimum and help the engine achieve the ideal performance characteristics, special roller-type rocker arms with needle bearings are used. These also reduce top-end weight for excellent mass centralization.
  • The combustion chamber shape was precisely engineered to direct the fuel/air charge to the center of the piston for more efficient combustion and maximum power. Ceramic-composite plated cylinders provide excellent heat dissipation and reduced oil consumption.
  • High-quality forged aluminum pistons have a lightweight, high strength, compact design that contributes to reduced vibration.
  • Sophisticated fuel injection is used on the Bolt R-Spec to deliver the best urban riding fun with strong acceleration. 3D maps for ignition timing and fuel injection have been developed and these settings deliver outstanding acceleration in the mid and low-speed ranges.
  • The stainless steel air cleaner cover provides a “raw metal” look that accentuates the Bolt R-Spec’s distinctive styling. And the air cleaner design helps provide great intake efficiency and enhanced torque characteristics.
  • A 2-into-1 exhaust pipe layout on the right side of the engine contributes to the lively performance and styling of the machine. The minimalist-style exhaust system delivers a throaty and pleasing exhaust note.
  • The clutch uses a rubber damper to reduce the fatigue that can come with frequent engagement/disengagement in stop and go city traffic. Riders will certainly appreciate the extra comfort the design provides.
Chassis/Suspension:
  • A double-cradle frame enhances city riding enjoyment. The engine is mounted to the frame as a stressed member with a rigid mount system that provides precise handling.
  • The low-set seat is a mere 27.2 inches off the pavement, so most riders can easily put both feet firmly on the ground at a stop, as well as enjoy the great riding position the seat provides.
  • Bolt R-Spec’s short, 61.8-inch wheelbase contributes to the bike’s lively handling, providing for tight turns in city riding and solid handling on the road.
  • The beefy front 41mm fork tubes offer excellent suspension performance and the twin rear shocks, which include piggyback style gas chambers, have been tuned to provide great comfort and handling while contributing to the machine’s low profile.
  • At just 21mm wide, the drive belt contributes to the slim and clean look of the rear end. The belt has a carbon-fiber core which adds strength and durability for longevity.
  • 12-spoke cast wheels are used to provide strength and toughness. Bridgestone® 100/90-19 size front and 150/80-16 size rear bias-type tires help provide excellent road grip.
  • The 298mm front disc brake and 298mm rear disc brake both use wave rotors, the style usually found on sport bikes. The front brake uses a floating-mount for great heat-distortion resistance, contributing to excellent braking performance.
  • The 3.2 gallon fuel tank is a traditional teardrop style, with a slim shape that includes flattened top and side surfaces to enhance Bolt R-Spec styling.
Additional Features:
  • LED rear taillight looks cool and adds to the modern bobber appeal.
  • Steel front and rear fenders are ideal for personalization, including paint and customization.
  • Solo rider saddle adds to the minimalist bobber look.


  • MSRP*$8,390 (Raven) Available from July 2014
    $8,390 (Matte Silver) Available from July 2014
    Engine
    Type58-cubic-inch (942cc) air-cooled 4-stroke, V-twin, SOHC, 4-valve
    Bore x Stroke85.0 x 83.0
    Compression Ratio9.0:1
    Fuel DeliveryFuel Injected
    IgnitionTCI: Transistor Controlled Ignition
    Transmission5-speed multiplate wet clutch
    Final DriveBelt
    Chassis
    Suspension FrontTelescopic fork, 4.7-in travel
    Suspension RearDual piggyback shocks, 2.8-in travel
    Brakes FrontWave-type disc, 298mm
    Brakes RearWave-type disc, 298mm
    Tires Front100/90-19M/C 57H
    Tires Rear150/80-16M/C 71H
    Dimensions
    L x W x H90.2 X 37.2 x 44.1 in
    Seat Height27.2 in
    Wheelbase61.8 in
    Ground Clearance5.1 in
    Fuel Capacity3.2 gal
    Fuel Economy**51 mpg
    Wet Weight***540 lb
    Other
    Warranty1 Year (limited Factory Warranty)
     

info courtesy - starmotorcycles.com
video-youtube.com

Thursday, August 28, 2014

2015 Yamaha YZ250F First Ride Review-courtesy-motorcycle.com


2015 Yamaha YZ250F

Editor Score: 95.0%
Engine 19.0/20
Suspension/Handling 15.0/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 8.0/10
Instruments/Controls5.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 10.0/10
Appearance/Quality 10.0/10
Desirability 10.0/10
Value 9.0/10
Overall Score95/100
It’s safe to say that Yamaha came about as close as a manufacturer can to setting the motocross world on fire with the YZ250F in 2014. Borrowing heavily from the architecture of its revolutionary YZ450F, the company’s all-new quarter-liter contender broke cover with a new, fuel-injected, rearward-inclined engine that places the straight downdraft intake out front and the exhaust in the rear. In addition to the new cylinder head’s symmetrical port design, which allowed Yamaha engineers to extract a lot more power from the engine, the compact engine allowed Yamaha to centralize the 250F’s mass in an all-new compact bi-lateral beam chassis that is shared with the YZ450F.
Still, savvy motoheads might beg the question that if all of the technology from the YZ250F was effectively handed down from its big sister, how is it that the 250F dominates its class where the 450F has pretty much failed to do so? There are a lot of ways to answer that question, and most of the debate would likely revolve around power management and, by extension, handling, when dealing with a high-steroid 450cc four-stroke single.
Yamaha invited us to Southern California’s Glen Helen Raceway to sample the 2015 YZ250F. Already the class leader, the 250F benefits from minor tweaks that add up to significant improvements over the revolutionary 2014 model.
Yamaha invited us to Southern California’s Glen Helen Raceway to sample the 2015 YZ250F. Already the class leader, the 250F benefits from minor tweaks that add up to significant improvements over the revolutionary 2014 model.
All we do know for sure is that the same radical changes that Yamaha brought to the YZ250F obsoleted the previous model and turned the new bike into a winner right out of the crate. The new design has already proven itself with multiple wins by factory-backed Yamaha riders Jeremy Martin and Cooper Webb in the 2015 Lucas Oil 250cc Pro Motocross Championship, where Martin is the current class points leader.
With a total revamp of the YZ250F already accomplished, Yamaha’s approach for 2015 was merely to improve on the existing design by addressing a few details – call it evolution of a revolution – and the company graciously invited us out to Southern California’s Glen Helen Raceway to sample the new machine for ourselves. We loved last year’s bike, but this year’s is even better.
249cc engine features a 6.2-degree rearward slanted cylinder and reverse cylinder head configuration with a straight downdraft intake and symmetrical ports. The combination yields a compact powerhouse that centralizes the engine’s mass in the chassis. Yamaha has revised the exhaust cam to make the ’15 model much easier to start.
249cc engine features a 6.2-degree rearward slanted cylinder and reverse cylinder head configuration with a straight downdraft intake and symmetrical ports. The combination yields a compact powerhouse that centralizes the engine’s mass in the chassis. Yamaha has revised the exhaust cam to make the ’15 model much easier to start.
If you read our review of the 2014 YZ250F in Alabama, you know that 2014 could be a cantankerous starter when hot, despite its excellent fuel-injection, which uses a single 10-hole injector fed by a fuel pump delivering 47 psi to its 44mm Keihin throttle body. Yamaha engineers have addressed the issue by going to a new exhaust cam that retains the lift and duration of the previous cam but the angle of the auto decompression pin has been altered 6 degrees. The difference is immediately noticeable, as the 2015 is way easier to kickstart, and fires up much more readily, than the 2014.
Once out on the track, another of Yamaha’s changes was immediately noticeable right from the first hit of the throttle: The 2015 YZ250F’s ECU has been recalibrated with new 3D fuel and ignition maps, which are still adjusted based upon gear position. The new maps provide smoother power control at lower rpm. Yamaha claims that they also offer broader mid-range torque and smoother high-rpm overrev, but those changes are less obvious. We can vouch for the 250F’s more linear throttle response off the bottom. The 2014 model felt somewhat choppy in the off-on throttle transition by comparison, but you can practically count each revolution build as you roll on the throttle now. It’s such a difference that some members of other test crews swore that the YZ250F felt like it made more bottom-end power than last year’s bike. Not so, says Yamaha. It just runs cleaner.
One minor change for 2015 is an easier throttle pull, courtesy of a lighter throttle return spring. It wasn’t readily apparent at the track, but it should help to reduce rider fatigue during a long moto.
One minor change for 2015 is an easier throttle pull, courtesy of a lighter throttle return spring. It wasn’t readily apparent at the track, but it should help to reduce rider fatigue during a long moto.
Internally, the YZ250F’s engine also gets a few minor tweaks for 2015. Its 77.0 x 53.6mm bore and stroke are the same as the 2014 – and the 2013 for that matter – but the 2015 piston’s ring lands have been change to provide better oil control, and the titanium exhaust valves feature a new coating that is more durable than the previous coating. The five-speed transmission’s gear ratios are unchanged, but the gear stop lever has been changed from a ball-bearing-style to a positive roller-style to improve shift quality. The 250F’s power is transmitted through a nine-plate clutch.
And it’s a heck of a lot of power. Yamaha has claimed all along that the engine makes 40 horsepower, and since they let us keep the unit we sampled at Glen Helen, we intend to put that claim to the test on the dyno. But there’s no denying that this is one fast 250cc four-stroke, building fantastic thrust right off the bottom and transitioning into a healthy mid-range and maintaining its brawny feel all the way to the rev limiter. After spending all morning on the Glen Helen track, expert tester Ryan Abbatoye once again proclaimed his admiration for the engine, which delivered enough oomph for him to clear a jump he had previously only been able to clear on a 450cc machine. The biggest difference between the Yamaha and its competition right now is that there are simply no flat spots in the YZF’s powerband, which not only makes it feel fast but also makes it easier to ride by novice and vet riders.
We already knew that the 2014 YZ250F ripped, and the 2015 edition is no different. Ace test rider Ryan Abbatoye put our test bike through its paces at Glen Helen and reported that the 2015 makes all the forward thrust that made the ’14 so awesome, and the revised ECU calibration makes it easier than ever to haul the mail.
We already knew that the 2014 YZ250F ripped, and the 2015 edition is no different. Ace test rider Ryan Abbatoye put our test bike through its paces at Glen Helen and reported that the 2015 makes all the forward thrust that made the ’14 so awesome, and the revised ECU calibration makes it easier than ever to haul the mail.
As our riding session took place on an open track day at Glen Helen, it didn’t take long before the track was extremely rutted up by the constant pounding of the masses, and that gave us a chance to gauge the new front fork settings that Yamaha has come up with for the YZ250F’s KYB Speed-Sensitive System inverted front fork. The 2015 has been set up with slightly more oil than the 2014, and its compression and rebound settings have been firmed up as well. Our experience on the choppy Glen Helen track led us to reduce the rear sag height and then reduce the compression to bring everything into better balance. After that, we had no complaints with the action of the fork or its fully adjustable KYB rear shock.
We loved the 2014’s slender, aluminum bilateral beam chassis, and the 2015 is identical in every way. It boasts razor-sharp turning manners while remaining straight as a string on rough, high-speed straightaways. Frankly, it’s excellent. Ditto for the YZF’s slim cockpit which features a very flat seat and a recessed fuel cap that allows the rider to really get forward on the machine in the turns (the YZF’s 2.0-gallon fuel tank is located mid-ship in the chassis, under the seat, in keeping with its mass-centralization goals). The handlebar mounts also offer four positions for a total of 36mm of adjustment to accommodate riders of various sizes.
The YZ250F’s slim bilateral beam aluminum chassis gives the bike a light, flickable feel, and it is as stable in the air as it on the ground, which should increase rider confidence at all skill levels.
The YZ250F’s slim bilateral beam aluminum chassis gives the bike a light, flickable feel, and it is as stable in the air as it on the ground, which should increase rider confidence at all skill levels.
Some of the other changes that Yamaha called out were either not readily apparent on the track, or they were mostly cosmetic, but they are still appreciated. They include a lighter throttle return spring that is claimed to reduce throttle pull effort by 20 percent. Maintaining the YZ250F’s air filter is now easier than before, as Yamaha has replaced the three 8mm bolts that hold the upper “fuel tank” shroud with Dzus fasteners for completely tool-less removal.
The 2015 features the same 250mm wave rotor front disc and two-piston caliper as the 2014 model. While that is a little bit of surprise since the competition is making the move to an even larger 270mm front rotor, we have no complaints about the Yamaha’s front braking power or feel, and the same goes for the 245mm rear rotor and single-piston caliper out back.
Yamaha continues to resist the air-sprung fork trend in motocross and stick with a proven coil-spring design. The YZ250F’s KYB fork features Speed-Sensitive damping cartridges with revised settings for 2015. Suspension travel is 12.2 inches up front. The fully adjustable KYB piggyback reservoir shock out back provides 12.4 inches of travel.
Yamaha continues to resist the air-sprung fork trend in motocross and stick with a proven coil-spring design. The YZ250F’s KYB fork features Speed-Sensitive damping cartridges with revised settings for 2015. Suspension travel is 12.2 inches up front. The fully adjustable KYB piggyback reservoir shock out back provides 12.4 inches of travel.
Lastly, the 2015 YZ250F gets new graphics that are embedded into the radiator shrouds to make them less prone to peeling. The YZ250F remains available in two color schemes as well: Team Yamaha Blue/White, or White and Red. Capping off the styling appointments are a new Gold D.I.D. 520 chain with a coating that makes it more corrosion resistant and black Excel rims, also new.
Best of all, though, is that the changes Yamaha has made to enhance the YZ250F don’t come with an increased MSRP; Yamaha is holding firm with the YZ250F at $7490. That’s a lot of money, but when you consider the technology and performance that Yamaha has poured into the YZ250F, that’s chump change. Last year’s bike was revolutionary. This year’s is evolutionary. Either way, Yamaha’s Japanese and European rivals had better have done their homework if they are going to topple the YZ250F from its perch atop the 250cc motocross class.
Yamaha is the only manufacturer to offer its motocross models in two color choices. The 2015’s optional white/red/black version features more subdued graphics in a color scheme that harkens back to Yamaha’s old European factory racing colors.
Yamaha is the only manufacturer to offer its motocross models in two color choices. The 2015’s optional white/red/black version features more subdued graphics in a color scheme that harkens back to Yamaha’s old European factory racing colors.
2015 Yamaha YZ250F Specs
MSRP $7,490
Engine Liquid-cooled four-stroke single, DOHC four-valve head
Displacement 249cc
Bore x stroke 77.0 x 53.6mm
Horsepower 40 rwhp (claimed)
Torque N/A
Compression ratio 13.5:1
Fuel System Keihin EFI, 44m throttle body
Ignition TCI
Transmission Five-speed
Final drive Chain
Frame type Bilateral beam aluminum
Front suspension Inverted KYB fully adj. fork w/Speed Sensitive System; 12.2 in. of travel
Rear suspension KYB fully adjustable monoshock w/piggyback reservoir, 50mm piston; 12.4 in. of travel
Front brake Nissin two-piston caliper 250mm wave-style disc
Rear brake Nissin single-piston caliper 245mm wave-style disc
Front tire Bridgestone M404-A 80/100-21
Rear tire Bridgestone M403 100/90-19
Wheelbase 58.1 in.
Rake 27°08´
Trail 118mm
Seat height 38.0 in.
Ground clearance 12.8 in.
Wet Weight 231 lbs. (claimed)
Fuel capacity 2.0 gal.
Color choices Blue & White / White Red & Blackcourtesy-motorcycle.com            

2MotoTech Android App for Motorcycle off road repairing


Application available for riders, mechanics and all DIY out there.
It can solve your general problems which generally comes while riding or repairing.
The app is not for engine overhauling.
valid for 6 months and cost of application is 182Rs. or 3$(USD) Right now launching offer is 100Rs. or 2$ valid only for 30days..thanks.
you can buy the product by paying via bank wire transfer or paypal if out of India.
The application is available to download on this page. 
Once you download the app contact me via email for banking details.
License code will be given after payment confirmation.
Up-gradation will be always there in the database but cant upgrade existing app. 
No refund.
Suggestions welcome
Download the App from below link. If any issues feel free to contact on macasp@gmail.com. Thank you.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzDBvu0KE8vyX3EwdlpHYXRLSUE/edit?usp=sharing

Monday, August 25, 2014

Royal Enfield Bullet 500

Above video belongs to powerdrift. This blog or admin has got nothing to do with the information or video.

Courtesy
PowerDrift and Youtube.com

Monday, August 18, 2014

2MOTOTECH Android App.

"2mototech" android application launched. The application can help you to repair your motorcycle without anyone's help. Its for vehicle which are off road and not reachable to mechanics and are in remote place. It can also help to DIY riders. It is also helpful for riders and mechanics in general way. This is not for engine overhauling purpose but for at the time of "VOR" and for regular repairs..cost and other details will be given through macasp@gmail.com

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Parkerize Motorcycle Parts

courtesy link

The information belongs to respected link and author

Please click on the below link

http://www.ridingvintage.com/2014/08/how-to-parkerize-motorcycle-parts.html